MUSEUM OF BEER & BREWING
Milwaukee Beer History Tour


MILWAUKEE BEER HISTORY

UPDATED AUGUST 7, 2007

Welcome to Milwaukee, home of the Big 4 Breweries: Blatz, Pabst, Schlitz & Miller Brewing Companies.

In the mid-1960s, these 4 breweries were among the top ten breweries
in the World.

While Miller Brewing Company is the sole major production brewery left in operation in Milwaukee, we still have extensive historical and legendary brewing roots throughout the city as we had over 40 breweries in Milwaukee from 1840 to the present day.


In addition, we host 2 craft Microbreweries: Sprecher Brewing Company & Lakefront Brewing Company, with a third, Milwaukee Brewing Company, under construction and due to open this Winter.

In addition, enjoy our 7 Milwaukee-area brewpubs, including Milwaukee Ale House, Rockbottom, Stonefly, (formerly Onopa), Water Street (2 locations), Delafield Brewhaus and Silver Creek in Cedarburg.
Rumor has it we've got 3 more brewpubs in the works, including one at the Pabst Brewery complex.


When you visit Milwaukee, we'd especially like you to see the surviving
examples of Milwaukee's brewing past, including...

- Milwaukee's historic brewery buildings, including Pabst, Blatz, Schlitz, Gettelman, Graf, Obermann, Val Blat - now Leinenkugel 10th Street, and Gipfel-Union.

- Beer Baron's Mansions, including a tour of the Captain Frederick Pabst Mansion at 2000 W. Wisconsin.

- Milwaukee Breweries' saloons, "tied-houses" & taverns.

"Ghost signs" and Milwaukee Brewery Advertising.

- Milwaukee Beer Barons' resting places, Forest Home Cemetery & Calvary Cemetery.


Yes, Milwaukee does indeed continue to make Beer Famous !!!

Enjoy your visit to Milwaukee !!!

This website will be showing current and past images of Milwaukee's
brewing heritage, with information and addresses, so you can visit our city
both on-line and in person.

We update this Milwaukee Beer History tour often.

CAFE BRUCKE - WISCONSIN DOT BREWERY PLAQUE

(2101 N. Prospect)
This Wisconsin Department of Transportation bronze plaque is
on display at Cafe Brucke.

Erected in 1976, this plaque alerted motorists headed North on I-94
to Wisconsin's proud brewing industry.
This sign had spent many years in storage at the I-94 rest area in Kenosha.

This plaque has been donated to the Museum of Beer & Brewing,
courtesy Jerry Patzwald, co-owner with his wife Christine, of Cafe Brucke.

A) MILWAUKEE BREWERIES

1) SCHLITZ BREWING COMPANY


(Krug: 1849-1858) (Schlitz: 1858-1981) (View East)
Located on between Pleasant & Galena, Old World 3rd Street
& the Milwaukee River, the former Schlitz Brewery has been preserved
in the Schlitz Office Park.

SCHLITZ STOCK HOUSE


SCHLITZ BROWN BOTTLE PUB


(221 W. Galena) (View South)
The Brown Bottle Pub, Schlitz' former tasting room,
is now open again as the Libriamo Restaurant.

The Museum of Beer & Brewing meets the 1st Wednesday of every month
at Libriamo at 6 PM
The next meeting is in November

SCHLITZ BREWHOUSE A

(Built 1890) (View South)
Brewhouse "A", for a brief time considered site of the Harley Museum,
still stands just East of Libriamo Restaurant.

MBB ARCHIVES PHOTOS:

1) SCHLITZ OLD BOTTLEHOUSE - OLD & NEW BREWHOUSE

(View Southeast toward old Bottle House)

2) SCHLITZ BREWKETTLES


3) SCHLITZ OLD BOTTLE HOUSE

3) SCHLITZ BOTTLING

4) SCHLITZ BOTTLE INSPECTORS

5) SCHLITZ HOP BALES

6) SCHLITZ GRAIN ELEVATORS

7) SCHLITZ FILTRATION

SCHLITZ ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

SCHLITZ OLD BOTTLE HOUSE

SCHLITZ NEW BOTTLE HOUSE

SCHLITZ STABLES


Located on the Northside of Pleasant.

SCHLITZ GRAIN ELEVATORS

 

2) VAL BLATZ BREWING COMPANY



(1844 - 1959)
(All 3 Views Northwest - Note the Val Blatz Offices
in the lower center of the lower 2 images)
Located mostly on Broadway, but covering several blocks from Water Street
on the West, between Juneau & Highland, the Valentine Blatz City Brewery
is preserved as the Val Blatz Apartments and the Milwaukee School of Engineering's buildings.

VALENTINE BLATZ OFFICES

(1120 N. Broadway - Built 1890)
The former Val Blatz offices are now the Milwaukee School of Engineering
Alumni Partnership Center, after spending time in between as the Beer Barons
tavern & restaurant.

1956 BLATZ BREWHOUSE



(1025 - 1047 N. Broadway) (Brewery Building View Southwest)
The Blatz brewhouse is now includes the Campus Student Center and the Todd Wehr Auditorium of the Milwaukee School of Engineering.

BLATZ BOILERHOUSE & WAREHOUSE

(1120 N. Broadway) (Boiler Houuse - View North)
Located on Broadway between Juneau & Highland,
the former Blatz Brewery Warehouse & Boilerhouse are all preserved as
the Val Blatz apartments, created in 1988.

3) LEINENKUGEL 10TH STREET BREWERY
(Former G. HEILEMAN'S VAL BLATZ BREWERY




(1515 N. 10th Street - Built 1986)
G. Heileman, who had acquired the Blatz brand, built this microbrewery for a new line
of micro beers, opening in September of 1986 with Hans Kestler as Brewmaster.
It closed in 1989.
It was acquired by Miller Brewing Company for Leinenkugel in October 1995, after being used to brew Widmer & Goose Island beers.

4) PABST BREWING COMPANY

(Best: 1884 -1889) (Pabst: 1889-1997) (View Northwest)
Located on between Winnebago & State., I-43 & 6th Street.

The Pabst Brewery, begun as the Best Empire Brewery, awaits redevelopment, having been recently been acquired from WisPark by Towne Investments.


The Museum of Beer & Brewing has signed a letter of intent with BrewCity
Redevelopment, to locate in the 2nd floor of the Pabst offices.

The late Karl Strauss, 44-year Pabst employee and for 20 years, VP-Brewing, was the Museum of Beer & Brewing's Director Emeritus.

Jim Haertel of BrewCity Redevelopment is President of the Museum of Beer & Brewing, has title to the Pabst Brewery offices, Gift Shol & Blue Ribbon Hall.

(View West)

(View West)

(View East)

CAPTAIN FREDERICK PABST

The Captain Frederick Pabst Statue stands in a garden just outside Blue Ribbon Hall.

PABST BREWHOUSE



(1217 N. 10th St. - Built 1877) (View North)
Inside the Pabst Brewhouse, rests the copper brewkettles.

VISITORS CENTER - PABST BLUE RIBBON HALL

(901 W. Juneau Ave. - Built 1933)
The Pabst Visitor's Center highlights the history of brewing on a frieze
atop it's 4 walls.

PABST GIFT SHOP

(View West)


PABST STERNEWIRT


(View Northwest)
The Garden with the Captain Pabst statue is still just outside.)

PABST OFFICES & THE PABST GREAT HALL

(View Southeast)

(View South)
Pabst Guest Center Entry


(View West)

(View Southeast)

(View West)

(View Southwest)
(915 W. Juneau - Remodel 1890 - 917 W. Juneau - Built 1880)

PABST KING GAMBRINUS

Formerly located inside the courtyard outside of Blue Ribbon Hall
at the Pabst Brewery Tour Center on Highland, the King Gambrinus statue
has been relocated to the Pabst headquarters in Illinois

PABST FORSTKELLER




(View Southeast)
(1037 W. Juneau - Built 1872)
The former 1st Methodist Church

PABST GRAIN ELEVATOR

 

PABST MALT HOUSE

(1003 W. Juneau - Built 1882 & 1893)

PABST MILL HOUSE
(1002 W. Juneau - Built 1891)

PABST BOILER HOUSE
(N. 10th St. - Built 1891)

PABST PACKAGING WAREHOUSE

PABST REFRIGERATION HOUSE

PABST BOTTLE HOUSE


(Views Northeast)

(1140 N. 10th St. - Built 1891 - 1911)

PABST WASH HOUSE
(901 W. Winnebago Ave. - Built 1911)

PABST SILO

5) PABST - BEST SOUTHSIDE BREWERY


(1841-1886)
(View North)
Located in the the Tannery Complex at 750 W. Virginia,
the Bottle House Building still survives.
Begun as the Johann Meier Brewery, acquired by Franz Neukirch, and then by Charles T. Melmes, it grew into one of Milwaukee's largest, before being acquired by the Best Brewery, renamed the Best (later Pabst) Southside Brewery, before closing.

6) MILLER BREWING COMPANY

(Founded 1855 ) (View West-Southwest)
This is a view West down State Street, into Miller Valley.

MILLER 1886 BREWHOUSE





MILLER BREWHOUSE

MILLER FERMENTATION

MILLER OFFICES


(View Northeast of the old Miller Administration building on State Street.)
Miller Brewing Company is headquartered at 3939 W. Highland.


Dr. David Ryder, VP-Brewing, Miller Brewing Company,
one of the Museum of Beer & Brewing's Board of Directors.

PLANK ROAD BREWERY


(View South)
A 3-sided replica of the original Frederick Miller Plank Road Brewery (above),
now stands on a hill just east of the Miller Inn on State St.

MILLER INN



Miller Brewing Company's Hospitality & Tasting Room.

MILLER CAVES



(View South)
Just west and below the Plank Road Brewery are the Miller Caves.
Formerly the Miller Museum and before that, these were Miller Lagering Caves.

The last remaining cave is home to the Annual Museum of Beer & Brewing "Miller Caves Beer Dinner," to be held again on June 21, 2007, memoralizing a Wisconsin State Brewers Association meeting last held on December 17, 1954,
as depicted in the photo on the right.

The photo on the left shows the Museum of Beer & Brewing 2005
"Miller Caves Dinner" layout.

7) GETTELMAN BREWING COMPANY


(1854-1961) (View North)
The Museum of Beer & Brewing Board of Directors includes both
Nancy Moore Gettelman, Author of "A. Gettelman, 107 Years of a Family Brewery
in Milwaukee," and wife of the late Tom Gettelman, last Gettelman Brewery
President, as well as
Fred Gettelman, Great-grandson of Fritz Gettelman.

GETTELMAN BREWERY OFFICES

(4400 W. State)
Gettelman Brewing Company was acquired by Miller Brewing Company in 1961.
The Gettelman offices still remain, located just West of Miller Brewing
on State Street, labeled as the "Plank Road Brewery."

GETTELMAN BOTTLING HOUSE


The Gettelman Bottling House is located on State Street,
just North of the Miller Tour Center.

8) GIPFEL - UNION BREWERY

(1843-1892 - 1423 W. Juneau) (View Southwest)
Milwaukee's oldest brewery struture, built in 1853 by David Gipfel.

The Gipfel-Union is slated to be moved a block East & across the street in 2006.

9) JACOB OBERMANN BREWERY

(1854-1896 - 504 W. Cherry) (View Northwest)
The former Falk Brewery is slated to be torn down in late 2006.


A WALK THROUGH OBERMANN BREWERY

by ERIK PETERSON, MBB Board Member

A significant piece of Milwaukee’s brewing history is sitting on the corner of 5th & Cherry, only a couple of blocks from the Brewery Credit Union. It’s for sale. It could be a brewery once again. Or maybe a brewing museum. Local developers and nationally-known brewery historians have been looking at it for some time now.
With the removal of the Park East Freeway, many dilapidated, turn of the century industrial buildings are becoming hot properties. Obermann Brewery opened in 1854, and was Milwaukee’s largest brewery for 20 years. I stopped by the Brewery Credit Union to tell loan officer Steven Koski that I was researching the boarded-up property down the street from him. According to Steve, there was a fire at Obermann around the turn of the century. New investors were brought in, and thus the name was changed to Falk, Jung, and Borchart Brewing Co. Not long after that, Falk went on to pursue other interests (Falk Industries), as young Jung, a former brewing apprentice from Pabst Brewery bought out Falk and Borchart. The name was changed to Jung Brewery, and business prospered until sometime after its officially closing at prohibition. However, the building has survived demolition over the years by functioning as one of the city’s many generic scrap yards. Cans, metals, and pretty much anything picked up in the alleys was brought in to sell. In fact, the basement and sub-basement were still packed full of this valueless debris until last year.
The City of Milwaukee has owned the building since 2001, purchased through tax remediation. One of the first tasks was to hire a salvage/cleaning company to empty out the lower levels. There is a freight elevator, which was installed about 75 years ago. It would take brewery workers and supplies into the basement and sub-basement. On the main level, the floor is an original wood-plank design. When the elevator is lowered into the basement, its top creates a false-floor on the main level, effectively hiding the elevator and the lower levels from view. There is a pull rope to start or stop the elevator. According to one Dept. of City Development (DCD) employee, the basement contains vaulted tunnels made of cream city brick. The tunnel on the south end of the basement appears to lead under the street, toward the Hein Electric building.
As the first city employees ventured into the basement, their flashlight view from the elevator was one of piles of debris, some of it decades old. Broken furniture, wooden barrels, broken industrial machines, wooden carts with cast iron wheels, bags and boxes full of trash, piles of tin and aluminum cans with pull-tab tops were almost touching the ceiling…and shopping carts from more than a few local grocery chains. Within a few months, the building had been cleaned out, the windows and doors had been secured, a temporary lighting system had been wired in, and the electrical fuses had been restored, at least partially…
The first potential buyers were shown the building in 2002. On one early showing, an employee from DCD was giving a tour to a local developer, when the elevator quit working. After a brief walk around the lower levels, they had returned to the elevator, and found it non-responsive. They looked around the elevator car to see that there was no trap door on the ceiling. They looked around the lower levels to find that there were no staircases going up. There were workers on the main level, but they were using saws, air compressors, hammer drills, and other power tools, so getting their attention was hopeless. The city employee had his cellular phone with him, and was able to find a spot in the basement where he could get a signal strong enough to make a call. He didn’t have the numbers of any of the workers above them, so he dialed 911.
“We’re stuck in the basement of the Obermann Brewery building on 5th & Cherry.”
The fire department arrived, and came in through a door that had been left unlocked by the construction workers on the main level. They used axes to make a hole in the floor, then lowered a 20-foot aluminum ladder down to free the men trapped below. A fuse had blown. The City bought some spare fuses, and a ladder of their own to keep in the hole, for future escapes.
They are still looking for a buyer. Obermann’s entryway on Cherry Street is just simple wood steps. Once inside, the first floor appears to have been remodeled in the 60’s or early 70’s, based on the interior design. There is one restroom and a few offices. The 2nd floor is open, with a staircase, drop ceiling, and fluorescent lights. Taking the elevator up, the roof is flat, with a rubber membrane cover, and a few leaks. The roof level seems to be about 2500 square feet, with spectacular views in all directions: Brewers Hill, downtown, the Bradley center, and nearby historic churches.
Nearby was Stout Bros. Public House, one of Milwaukee’s newer brewpubs. Unfortunately, Stout Bros. closed its doors around the 1st of September. Painted on the wall above the bar at Stout Bros. were the logos of many of Milwaukee’s original breweries, including Obermann.
Obermann building facts: 11,000 sq.ft. Cream City brick construction & exterior. Missing cornices. Some bricked-up windows. Shipping docks. 3 floors. 2 basement levels. Flat roof.

10) JOHN GRAF WEISS BEER BREWERY

(1883-1920)
(2201 W. Greenfield)
Located just a few blocks East of the Little Schlitz Pub, the Graf Weiss Beer
Brewery currently houses the Siemann Sign Company.

11) STOUT BROTHERS BREWPUB

12) WISCONSIN BREWING CO.

13) CREAM CITY BREWING COMPANY
(1853-1937)
(This brewery was located on 13th Street, between Galena & Cherry)

14) INDEPENDENT MILWAUKEE BREWING CO.
(1901-1962)

15) FRANZ FALK's BAVARIAN BREWERY

15A) FALK, JUNG & BORCHART

(1855-1892)

16) E.L. HUSTING

17) PHILIP JUNG
(1896-1920)

18) OTHERS

Badger Brewing (1900-1901)

Banner Brewing (1933-1935)

Capitol Brewing (1933-1948)

Century Brewing (1933)

Eagle Brewing (1841-1861)

Henry Fahl (1897-1898)

Fischbach (1933-1936)

Germantown Spring (1916)

Green Bay Road (1859-1860)

Hellburg (1859-1860)

Lake (Owens) (1840-1864)

Main Street (1859-1862)

A.H. Manske (1896)

Meeske & Hoch (1870-1878)

Milo (1919)

Milwaukee Beer (1938-1939)

Milwaukee Brewery (1993-1920)

Milwaukee Brewing Assoc. (1875-1881)

Mutual (1913-1916)

Old Lager (1934-1938)

Phoenix (1852-1868)

Herman Reuthlisberger (1840-1841)

Roedel (1897-1899)

Sand's Spring (1861-1867)

Union (1848-1892)

Franz Zimmerman (1878-1885)

B) TRANSPORTATION

THE MILWAUKEE ROAD BEER LINE

Known by the Milwaukee Road crew as the "roller coaster," this was one of the railroad's most profitable lines, serving the Blatz, Schlitz and Pabst Breweries along what is now Commerce Street.
Located across from Lakefront Brewery (1872 N. Commerce) & East of the Holton Street Bridge is the last remaining section of the Beer Line trestle.


BEER WAGON

Miller Beer Wagon


Pabst Beer Wagon


Schlitz Shipping Yard with Beer Wagons


Schlitz Beer Wagon

BEER TRUCK

Miller Delivery Truck

BEER REFRIGERATOR CAR

Miller Wood-sheathed Reefer Cars

C) BEER BARON'S MANSIONS
The Barons of Milwaukee's brewing industry built several elaborate mansions.
A few excellent examples still remain, while others fell to the wrecking ball.

CAPTAIN FREDERICK PABST

(2000 W. Wisconsin - View North - Built 1892)
This Flemish-style mansion is open for tours.

FREDERICK PABST JR.

(3112 W. Highland Blvd - View Northeast)

JOSEPH UIHLEIN (SCHLITZ)
(3318 N. Lake Drive - Built 1907 - Remodeled 1917)

ERWIN & PAULA UIHLEIN (SCHLITZ)
(3319 N. Lake Drive - Built 1913)

(FORMER) ROBERT A. UIHLEIN RESIDENCE

(3252 N. Lake Drive - Built 1917 by Architect William Kosick)
This Greek Revival residence, built for Mary Iisley Uihlein and Robert A. Uihlein, is part of the 2006 Breast Cancer Showhouse for a Cure from June 10 - 25.
Tickets are $20
Tour hours are Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays & Saturdays from 10 AM - 4 PM; Thursdays from 10 AM - 8 PM and Sundays from Noon - 4 PM
More information: www.breastcancershowhouse.org - (414) 297-9152

D) PARKS, THEATERS, RESTAURANTS, BANK, HOTELS,....

MILLER PARK

MILLER BREWERY PAVILION, O'DONNELL PARK

PABST THEATER

(144 E. Wells at Wisconsin Ave. - Rebuilt 1895)
(Left - View Northwest) (Right - View Northeast)
The Nunnemacher Opera House was acquired by Captain Frederick Pabst and renamed the Stadt Opera House. After a fire demolished most of the building, it was rebuilt in 1895 and renamed the Pabst Theater.

SCHLITZ AUDUBON NATURE CENTER
Formerly Uihlein Nine Mile Farms
Bayside, WI

UIHLEIN HALL, MARCUS AMPITHEATER

SCHLITZ TIVOLI GARDENS

(729 S. 5th - View West)
Now home to the Ballet Foundation of Milwaukee (504 W. National),
this is the sole surviving example of the Schlitz Palm Gardens.
 

SCHLITZ HOTEL & PALM GARDEN

Located on Grand, now Wisconsin Avenue, where the Grand Avenue Mall is located, the Schlitz Palm Garden was built by architects Kirchen & Rose in 1896.
It closed in 1921, was converted into the Garden Theater in 1922
and demolished in 1963.


(Inside the Palm Garden)

WASHINGTON PARK WITH BLATZ TEMPLE OF MUSIC

BLATZ PAVILION IN ESTABROOK PARK
Glendale, WI

PABST FARMS

PABST WHITE FISH BAY RESORT

GARFIELD PARK, (PABST PARK)
Acquired from the Milwaukee Schuetzen Gesellschaft, Pabst Park at 3rd & Burleigh is now Garfield Park.

BLATZ PARK

SCHLITZ PARK
Schlitz Park, formerly Quentin's Park, was located at 8th & Walnut, which is now Carver Park and Roosevelt Jr. High School.

SCHLITZ HOTEL

SECOND WARD SAVINGS BANK

Known as the "Brewers Bank," with Uihlein, Blatz & Pabst executives as board members, was located on Water & 3rd, now 910 N. 3rd St., home of the Mlwaukee County Historical Society.

RED CIRCLE INN

Formerly known as the Nashoda Inn (in Nashoda, WI, just South of Hwy 16), Pabst acquired it in 1889 and renamed it the Red Circle Inn.

E) "TIED HOUSE" TAVERNS & SALOONS
Milwaukee hosted many brewery-owned saloons & taverns,
some of which are still in operation.

LITTLE SCHLITZ PUB

Located at 2501 W. Greenfield, this is now the Little Schlitz Pub,
after starting out as the Coventry Saloon & later as Benjamin Briggs.

Note the blue and white ceramic Schlitz sign

SOBELMAN'S - SCHLITZ

(1900 West St. Paul - View Northwest)
Dave Sobelman has been recently restored his building Located in the Menomonee Valley, highlighting the Schlitz globe.

3 BROTHERS - GLOBE TAVERN - SCHLITZ

(2414 S. St. Clair in Bayview - View South)
The 3 Brothers Serbian Restaurant
still wears the Schlitz Globe on it's rooftop.

FORMER M&M CLUB - PABST

(300 S. Water St. - View Northeast)
Due to be remodeled into an Irish Pub,
the former M&M Club was a former Pabst Tied House.
Note the Pabst logo on the South wall.

REGANO'S GOLDEN COIN (PABST)
(1004 E. Brady, at Astor, built by Architect Otto Schrank in 1890)

SLIM'S - PABST

(338 1st St.)

TROCADERO (SCHLITZ TIED HOUSE)


(1758 N. Water St.)

MILLER TIED HOUSE


Located at Hubbard & Garfield, Brewers Hill

FORMER SCHLITZ TIED HOUSE

Located at Holton and Clarke.

FORMER MILLER TIED HOUSE



Located at the Northend of the Holton St. Bridge


FORMER SCHLITZ TIED HOUSE



Located at Astor & Brady

WILLIE & EDITH NORWOOD'S FORMER MILLER TIED HOUSE



Brewers Hill, on Galena


BARTOLOTTA RESTAURANT (FORMER PABST TIED HOUSE)

7616 W. State, Wauwatosa, WI)

CLUB GARIBALDI - SCHLITZ
Located on Superior St. in Bayview

HUMBOLDT GARDENS - SCHLITZ


(2249 N. Humboldt at North Ave. - View Southwest)

FORMER SCHLITZ TIED HOUSE ON NORTH
3425 W. North Ave.


SUBWAY SANDWICHES - PABST



Walnut & 35th


COMMUNITY CENTER - SCHLITZ

(3418 N. Martin Luther King Dr., formerly the Main Event)

F) BEER BARONS FINAL RESTING PLACES

1) CALVARY CEMETERY
5503 W. Bluemound Rd., Milwaukee, WI

- Frederick Miller (1824-1888)

2) FOREST HOME CEMETERY
(2405 W. Forest Home)
Forest Home Cemetery is located between Forest Home,
27th & Lincoln on Milwaukee's Southwestside.

The Forest Home Cemetery grounds are open for tours

While a bit rainy, the June 18 Beer Baron's of Milwaukee lecture by John Eastberg in the Chapel at Forest Home featured a terrific slide show.

Forest Home President Paul Haubrich led us on a walking tour which included the Schlitz-Uihlein, Pabst and Blatz memorial sites.
The highlight was the opening and peering into the Blatz crypt.
MBB attendees & friends included Erik Peterson, Jim & Karen Haertel & Bob Giese.
Both Bob Giese & Erik took photos & we also videotaped the lecture and tour.

Notable Beer Barons buried at Forest Home Cemetery include...


Jacob Best
(1786-1861)

Valentine Blatz (1826-1894)

August Krug (1814-1856)

Frederick Pabst (1836-1904)

Joseph Schlitz (1831-1875)

August Uihlein (1842-1911)

 

G) ART & DECORATION

VILLA TERRACE MUSEUM: CYRIL COLNIK
(2220 N. Terrace Avenue)
The Beer Barons Breweries & Mansions were decorated with a flourish,
from the entry gates and window grates to the chandeliers.
The Milwaukee master of brass, bronze & wrought iron was Cyril Colnik.

Thanks to the Kohler Foundation, Villa Terrace acquired his collection of artifacts
from his daughter Gretchen Colnik in 2002.

H) GHOST SIGNS

What is a "Ghost Sign"?
Ghost signs are beer advertisements painted on brick walls in Milwaukee and throughout the U.S. Some are most vivid after an adjacent wall has been torn down. Others are visible just after a rainfall. According to the [Society for Commercial Archeology], a sign may fall into several categories. It may be a landmark (at least 20 years old and of special significance because of its design, size or configuration). Or it could be historic (theater marquees, neon letters and wood signs whose craftsmanship and construction materials speak of earlier eras). Or it may be a "ghost sign", a faded, painted sign, at least 50 years old, on an exterior building wall heralding an obsolete product, an outdated trademark or a clue to the history of the building's occupancy. These ghost signs often reappear after a rainstorm or following the demolition of a neighboring building. (1)

“The early billboards could be found on barns and brick walls, in popular alleyways and warehouses across the country from about the 1890s until the television age. . .. As time marched on, old buildings were torn down or the old signs were painted over. Yet a few remain, their lead lettering often serving as the sole reminder of the product or service they sold. Some are visible only after a rain, prompting the nickname "ghost signs." (2)

“The old sign painters used white lead for white, lampblack for black. They'd make a paper pattern of the design, then perforate the lines with a small device called a pattern wheel, a tiny spiked wheel on a handle. Roll the wheel around the lines of a pattern and the spikes would leave a series of holes. Then the painter would fasten the pattern to the wall and pat the outline with a cotton bag filled with chalk or powdered charcoal, called a "pounce" bag. The result was a dotted line, like connect-the-dots drawing. The paint was mixed with linseed oil and vanish, with perhaps gasoline as a rapid drying agent. The result was long-lasting, though time and sun ages all paint. White lead deteriorated slowest of all the pigments, so many signs today are white "ghosts" of the original. Many old signs have vanished beneath fresh paint or stucco. Once painted over, the signs are destroyed, but stucco can fall off and, like a Rembrandt beneath a painting of poker playing dogs, the classic artwork resurfaces. We pass these fading examples of folk art without a second glance--old brick walls and barn sides proclaiming the virtues of products long since vanished from the market. All that remains is a wispy spirit, clinging to crumbling walls.” (3)

“According to the [Society for Commercial Archeology], a sign may fall into several categories. It may be a landmark (at least 20 years old and of special significance because of its design, size or configuration). Or it could be historic (theater marquees, neon letters and wood signs whose craftsmanship and construction materials speak of earlier eras). Or it may be a "ghost sign" — a faded, painted sign, at least 50 years old, on an exterior building wall heralding an obsolete product, an outdated trademark or a clue to the history of the building's occupancy. These signs often reappear after a rainstorm or following the demolition of a neighboring building.” (2)

Join us in documenting and helping to preserve Ghost Signs !!!

There are many more out there. Some have been repainted, such as the Riverwest Co-Op & the Gettelman sign in Waukesha
.

Please alert us as we plan an on-going gallery of “Ghost Sign” photos in our Virtual Exhibits to celebrate this example of signmaker's art.

CREDITS: (1) Beth Sherman, "Design Notes," Newsday, June 1, 1989
(2) Kaitlin Gurney, "Sign, sealed, delivered," The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC), October 1, 1999
(3) Ghosts on the Bricks by Joel M. Vance


ABC LIQUORS - SCHLITZ

(View West)
Located on the East wall of ABC Liquors on North Avenue, West of Holton Ave. in the Hembree neighborhood of Milwaukee.

RIVERWEST CO-OP - SCHLITZ

(View West)
Located on the East & West walls of the Riverwest Co-Op at 733 E. Clarke
in the Riverwest of Milwaukee.


LEE'S LOUNGE - BLATZ HEIDELBERG


(View Southeast)
Located at the North wall of Lee's Lounge at 2988 S. Kinnickinnic,
in the Bayview neighborhood of Milwaukee.

ED'S LOUNGE - JUNG


(View Northeast)
2 Jung signs, one on the East and another on the South walls of Ed's Lounge
at 2678 W. Center St, in the Brewers Hill neighborhood, just West of Riverwest.

GETTELMAN


(View East)
130 E. Keefe


I) DIVERSIFICATION & AFFILIATED INDUSTRIES

As Milwaukee's breweries grew, so did their need for supplies, from wood to steel to stainless kegs, brew kettles & fermentation tanks, cleaning chemicals, refrigeration equipment, barley malt, corn, hops, cans & bottles,...

During Prohibition and afterward, the breweries sought to diversify their investments.

Falk sold his brewing interests and started Falk Corporation

Fritz Gettelman developed the truck-mounted snowplow.

Tom Gettelman, after selling the Gettelman Brewery to Miller in 1961,
became President of Froedert Malting.

Froedtert Hospital opened in 1980 due to the efforts of the founder of Froedtert Malting.

Below is a list of current & past Milwaukee brewery suppliers and Milwaukee brewery owner affiliations & venues

Ace Chemical
8415 N. 87th St., Milwaukee WI 53226
John Kretsch, Ace Chemical Vice-President, one of the Museum of Beer & Brewing Board of Directors.

ADM
(see Froedtert)

AJS
Random Lake, WI

Allis Chalmers

Ball Metal Beverage Container
8500 W. Tower Rd., Milwaukee, WI.


Built as the Miller Brewing Can Division in 1974, sold to Reynolds Aluminum in 1993, acquired by Ball Metal Can Division in August 1998.

Banner Welding Systems

Founded and owned by David V. Uihlein from 1949-1984

Brew City Beer Gear

Briess Malting & Ingredients Company
Since 1876 in Chilton, WI

Busch Agricultural Resources Inc.
Manitowoc Malting Plant, located on 23 acres in Downtown Manitowoc, WI,
was built by Rahr Malting in 1847 and sold to Anheuser-Busch in 1962.

Continental Can
Started in 1950, the Continental Can plant on Port Washington Rd. in Glendale, WI, acquired by Cork Crown & Seal in 1990 and closed in 1992.

Cork, Crown & Seal
11801 W. Silver Spring Rd., Milwaukee, WI
(see also Continental Can)

Everbrite

Greenfield, WI

Falk
Milwaukee, WI

Froedtert Malt Co., Division of International Malting Co.

West Milwaukee, WI

Froedtert Hospital

Geyser Peak Winery
Former Schlitz Brewery acquisition

Heil Manufacturing


Hilton

Inland Label

KCS Industries
Formerly a division of the Banta Corporation, absorbed into Array Marketing Group

Krones USA
Franklin, WI
Founded in 1968, Krones USA is the sole US division of Krones AG, a German packaging & labeling corporation.
While equipment assembly has currently ceased, this location is the North American sales & service headquarters of Krones AG.

Kurth Malting

Ladish Malt Co.
Jefferson, WI, closed in 2005

Lesaffre Yeast Co.
Milwaukee, WI

Marcus Center - Uihlein Hall

Marquette University
Milwaukee, WI

The late John N. Ladish was Chairman of Ladish Malting for 52 years and Trustee Emeritus of Marquette Board of Trustees

Geo. J. Meyer Co.



Milwaukee, WI
Filler & labeler manufacturer, acquired by Figgie, broken up & sold to In-Line Labling Corporation and SASIB SPA in 1994.

Miller Malting Co.

Milwaukee School of Engineering
Milwaukee, WI

Dr. Robert R. Spitzer & David Uihlein Sr., announcing the Milwaukee School of Engineering Endowed Chair of Free Enterprise in 1999.
(see Murphy Products below)

Murphy Products Company - "Maltlage"
Schlitz Brewing Company sought to market their spent grain, collaborating with Dr. Robert R. Spitzer, President of Murphy Products Company, a midwestern feed manufacturer, which was headquartered in Burlington, WI.
L.A. Hunt, Assistant to the VP of Brewing and Manager of the Grain Department at Schlitz Brewing Company, developed the idea of "Brewers Wet Grains". Mr. Hunt was later to become VP-Brewery Products at Murphy Products.
In 1966, Murphy & Schlitz began developing"Maltlage," a branded version of Brewers Grain Silage, in the form of Brewers Wet Grain for dairy cows and feedlot beef.


The first field test began on a farm near Janesville, Wisconsin, with 50 head of beef cattle, leading to development of Murphy's 140-acre research farm in 1968.
Schlitz acquired Murphy's in late 1971.
The Murphy Maltlage program was so effective that it was spread to all of Schlitz's breweries throughout the US.

Dr. Robert R. Spitzer, President of Murphy Products, later developed the "Food for Peace" program for President Gerald Ford and was Milwaukee School of Engineering President from 1977 to 1991.

Perlick
Milwaukee, WI

Pillsburg Grain Elevators
Located of Port Washington Rd. in Glendale, these former Schlitz grain elevators were demolished in March & April 1999

Pressed Steel
Milwaukee, WI

Rahr Malting

Schlitz - Eline
Schlitz produced candy, chocolate & cheese.

This label shows the former Schlitz chocolate plant, located East of Green Bay Road in Glendale.

Schmidt/Kilback

Schreier Malting
Sheboygan, WI

A.O. Smith


Milwaukee, WI


So-Lite

Sprinkman Manufacturing

Uihlein-Wilson Architects

Vilter



Cudahy, WI

Walker Stainless

WB Bottle Co.

FOR MORE BREWING HISTORY, VISIT...

WISCONSIN HISTORY TOUR

OLD MILWAUKEE ADVERTISING

OLD BREWERY TOURS

(c) 2006 Jeff Platt - Suds, Wine & Spirits